Author: Brian McAsey

Just Don’t Call Me Late For Dinner

A dozen years ago there was a black comedy French film called Le diner de cons. The story is about a group of prominent French businessmen who hold a weekly dinner to see who could invite the biggest idiot. The film was popular and spun off into a theatrical version and there was a Hindi remake in 2007 called Bheja Fry. Predating the French film by another 10 years was the American independent film Dogfight. Dogfight made a paltry 300 grand, not enough to buy an average priced house today in Calgary, even after making the adjustment for inflation....

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Paul May Be Dead But This Film Is Boring

The Last Testament of George Harrison is a feature documentary narrated by an audio recording allegedly made by the late titular Beatle. Apparently, Harrison just before his death decided to expose a massive cover-up that plagued him and his former band-mates for decades. The terrible secret is the fact that Paul McCartney died in an automobile accident back in 1966 and the remaining three Beatles conspired successfully with MI5 to cover-up the accident. Lucky for the filmmakers that they were the recipients of the mysterious recording and luckier still that it runs 100 minutes-a standard time for a film...

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Atom Egoyan’s Chloe is Creepy, Sexy… and Lousy

Living in a post-Austin Powers world unfortunately means the name Chloe evokes images of a web-footed, French child prostitute with evil progeny. Not so with Atom Egoyan’s thriller Chloe. The Canadian director’s most recent film offering, last spotted at the Toronto Film Festival in fall of 2009, is now in wide release. Touted as an erotic thriller, the film has raised a few eyebrows on account of the leads baring their souls and bodies repeatedly and exhaustively. The film is also famed as an all too rare Canadian film business success. Made with French money and filmed in Canada...

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White Ribbon a Blue Ribbon Effort

Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke makes the bleakest and most disturbing films you have ever seen. He also makes some of the most beautiful, intelligent and relevant films to flicker against the screen. Whether it is the horrifying Funny Games or the Kafkaesque Cache the Teutonic cineaste manages to challenge what he calls the “American barrel down cinema that dis-empowers the viewer”. Haneke makes films that demand genuine and, more often than not, uncomfortable cogitation. White Ribbon is Haneke’s latest celluloid offering and it is simply sublime. The German language film won the prestigious Palm d’Or at Cannes and the Golden Globe for Best Foreign...

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The Ten Best Horror Films You’ve Never Seen

This Halloween video stores will be swamped with patrons clamouring to be scared silly. In the finite universe of horror-cinema most will settle for a franchise fright film or take a chance on an array of current B movie offerings– but not you sweet scare-seeking cinephile. The following list of overlooked horror films, not obscure or ancient but a little off the beaten path and perhaps forgotten, will save you from a frightful night of lame gore, unmotivated zombies, horror porn, and forgettable final girls. Sunshine (2007) – Look closely at Danny Boyle’s resume and you will find this forgotten...

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